RESOURCES

 < Home 

  • Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are solid-state semiconductors that convert electrical energy directly into light in a process called electroluminescence - a process that requires much less energy than traditional light sources. When an LED is switched on, the electrical current allows electrons to recombine with holes (a convenient term for the absence of an electron where one could exist!). When an electron combines with a hole, it excites and releases photons (light). This process is achieved using a p-n junction. A p-n junction is formed by p-type and n-type semiconductor materials in very close contact. The term junction refers to the boundary interface where the two regions of the semiconductor meet. If they were constructed of two separate pieces this would introduce a grain boundary, so p-n junctions are created in a single crystal of semiconductor by doping each side to form the differing properties.

  • Aside from the method of coupling energy into the mercury vapour, Induction lamps are very similar to conventional fluorescent lamps. Mercury vapour in the discharge vessel is electrically excited to produce short-wave ultraviolet light, which then excites the phosphors to produce visible light.